Depersonalization: Three Reasons You're NOT Going Crazy

Depersonalization: Three Reasons You're NOT Going Crazy

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It’s the question that virtually everyone asks themselves when they experience Depersonalization: Am I Going Crazy? Or what if I eventually go insane?

Before we go any further, let’s get this out of the way:

No, you’re absolutely NOT going 'crazy', 'insane',
'psychotic' or anything remotely like that.

Not even CLOSE!

And I’m about to tell you why in 3 simple steps.

1. DP IS A DEFENSIVE SYSTEM

What you are experiencing is your body and brain’s natural defense system that kicks in at times of trauma. This may have happened because of drugs, trauma, an accident --

But it doesn’t matter what caused it, the end result is exactly the same.

The feelings of being cut off from the world, unfamiliarity etc are your brain’s way of protecting you from what it perceives to be a dangerous situation. It can be frightening but it happens to people -- albeit briefly -- all the time. But unfortunately for an unlucky few like you and me, it can persist a bit longer.  

But the simple fact is that a defensive system is never going to cause psychosis or insanity.

Depersonalization: Three Reasons You're NOT Going Crazy

2. DP IS OFTEN INTERPRETED AS SOMETHING IT'S NOT

Depersonalization is only designed to help you through brief instances of trauma, like a car crash. It’s the reason you hear stories of people escaping car crashes, burning buildings and natural disasters without being able to recall how they did it.

Your brain turns off the paralysing fear response and allows you to calmly get out of the situation.

Typically the Depersonalization then dissipates naturally.

BUT -- If you continue to experience depersonalization into your normal daily life, as happens to many people like you and me, then it becomes a problem. If you’re sitting in your kitchen and experiencing ‘unexplained’ feelings of detachment and unfamiliarity, it’s not unusual to jump to the conclusion that...
...you must be going crazy, right?

That of course make the anxiety worse -- which make the brain think “there’s more danger here!” and turn up the depersonalization even more to protect itself. The anxiety heightens visual and aural sensitivity while your thoughts are racing to explain the DP feelings. 

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Depersonalization: Three Reasons You're NOT Going Crazy

3. DP IS ACTUALLY THE OPPOSITE OF INSANITY

And -- very importantly -- all the while, your reality testing remains intact, which is in psychiatric terms what primarily distinguishes people with actual psychosis from those without. Depersonalization, on the other hand is an anxiety-spectrum disorder -- and that's all it will ever be. 

If anything, with DP your reality testing is too heightened because of the fight-or-flight hyper awareness that the anxiety causes.

That's right -- what you are experiencing is nothing more than a natural and temporary habit of thought and is literally the opposite to going crazy!

The main thing to remember here is that all of it -- the anxiety,
the DP, the fear that you're going insane -- ALL of these are nothing
more than your body's natural reactions to what it
perceives to be a dangerous or traumatic situation. 

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So there you have it: 3 simple steps that
prove 100% that you're NOT going crazy!

It’s a frightening experience for sure, I understand that more than anyone -- but just remember that
you are safe and you are not going crazy, insane, psychotic or anything even remotely like that.

And if you think that DP might lead to something worse down the line?
Don't worry -- that won't happen either.

And the best news is that like any other negative habit of thinking,
it can be overwritten and recovered from completely.

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Ready to start your recovery from Depersonalization today?

Disclaimer: Please note that the medical information contained within this site, ebook, audiobook and related materials is not intended as a substitute for consultation with a professional physician and is not a recommendation of specific therapies.